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  • 25 Mar 2019
    The tragic Ethiopian Airline, ET-302,  that crushed on Sunday morning of 10th March, 2019, left all the 157 souls lost. Unfortunately, Anne was one of the passengers on board whose life was claimed. Until her demise, she had been enrolled for as an Engineering PhD student at Boku University in Vienna, Austria. Anne Birundi Mogoi was one of the pioneer PAUWES students of the first cohort in the Water Engineering track. She joined PAUWES in 2014 with a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) in Kenya. She was a results-oriented registered Civil Engineer with expertise in Water Resources development projects that focus on Water, Food and Energy Nexus, Sustainable Environment Management, Climate Change, Research, Innovation and Development. Anne was an excellent communicator accustomed to working in teams and individually with a superior eye for detail.She had been involved in the­ design and construction supervision of various water related projects in Kenya and the topographical mapping and planning of Nakuru, Naivasha and Nyeri Counties. Several friends and former PAUWES colleagues sent their tribute messages to mourn her death. Below are some of the tributes: Axel  NGUEDIA NGUEDOUNG from Cameroon  It is so sad to write to express this thought. I did not know that I could ever experience once more such a pain. Definitely, good things never stay for long!!! I find it very difficult to write these words as I did not expect in all scenarios in the past weeks writing words for such occasion. “The Lord has given, the Lord has taken”, but He gave us the opportunity to meet you, to know you, to enjoy the person you have been. We have just spent this small time together, but we’ve shared so much. I have found in you a colleague, a friend, a sister. There is so much to say on you but to keep it short, I will miss your smile, your joy, your fraternal warmth, your ambition and advices as person, sister. I cannot stop seeing picture of you smiling with these unique gestures. You are no more with us physically, but you will remain in our earth forever. I pray that the Almighty Lord welcomes you in his home and let you watch on us while smiling with the Angels up there!!! Go and rest in Peace Dada yangu!!!       Astride Mélaine ADJINACOU GNAHOUI from Cotonou, Benin For you my lovely Anna, May the name of the Lord be glorified. He gave you to us, He called you back. Anna, I just want to tell you that I am so deeply sorry because I didn't use to tell you how much you were hearty and a lovely person for me. Sorry Anne. You entered my life on 23rd of October 2014. We were to start our Master studies in Algeria in Tlemcen. We used to do our assignments together. Thank you for helping me a lot in English. Thank you for always remember my birthday. Thank you for going to church with me together sometimes. Thank you for fighting for our rights in Tlemcen. I remember when on a Thursday, we had an issue together, you came back to see me on Friday and said you were sorry about it. Thank you for being so hearty and forgive me to have not been all the time kind. Thank you for being so caring for me when I was sick in October 2015. You cleaned my room, prepare bathroom for me, checked on me until I recovered. Oh my God! Thank you Anna. My dear Anna, when you laugh, we could hear it from far.   You were so full of joy. I cannot even imagine how you will miss your parents. There is this big whole in my heart. If only I knew that God would call you back to him so early, I would have called you just to hear this laughing of yours. You were so intelligent and enthusiastic. My Anna, I blessed God for your life. You were an Heroine and I think you just go as an Heroine. I can never ever, never ever forget you. I continually pray for, ordering holy Mass for you my Anna, my sister from another mother. Condole yourself your parents and protect them from where you are, now you are even so shinning in the Stars. I believe you are one of the most beautiful of them. Blessings upon your family. I love you my friend. I do. Rest in God's peace my beautiful sister.   Devotha NSHIMIYIMANA  from Rwanda Dear Anne, It broke my heart to lose you but I know that no matter what you will always be with us. Even though your beautiful smile and laughter are gone forever, I will forever cherish your memories. Your constant support, your big heart and incredible personality that always look the best for everyone will forever live in my memories. Oh Anne, you are sadly missed but never forgotten.    Clarisse NIBAGWIRE  NISHIMWE from Rwanda   Ismael Jumare from Nigeria  It is really shocking to have received the sad news of the Ethiopian plane crash, which claimed the life of our beloved sister in the PAUWES family i.e. Anne Mogoi Birundu and other lives. Anne has been a morally sound, friendly and intelligent personality, and a great asset to Africa. So, it is indeed a great loss. I therefore, kindly pass my condolence to the family for the irreplaceable loss. May God comfort you all in your trying moments. Sincerely, Ismail Abubakar Jumare  Kay Nyaboe from Kenya   Lilies Kathambi from Kenya     Nabil KHORCHANI from Tunisia                                                                Nana Safiatu from Bukina Faso  "Verily to Allah, belongs what He took and to Him belongs what He gave". Anne was more than a classmate. Her good heart was abundant of love and empathy for every one of us. A humble sister who always cared and supported me during our years of studies in Tlemcen and even after.  Her personality taught me wisdom, humility and faith. I will always remember Anne’s kindness and that special glowing smile which was contagious with anyone she met. May Allah receive Anne's beautiful soul in Heaven and give her peace and eternal life. Lord, comfort us all bereaved ones, the family and friends, as we go through this huge loss.   Albert Khamala from Kenya  Madam President, as I fondly referred to You at PAUWES, indeed Anne was a great leader with all attributes of an excellent leader. In Anne, I saw Prof. Wangari Mathaai reborn, the love for humanity and natural resources. The world has lost a rare personality with strong heart and mentality. Anne, although gone, your spirit of Pan African Integration will forever live. We love you Anne, bye bye Anne. I will miss your strong heart, contiguous smile and laughter.   Kennedy Okuku from Kenya  We have lost one of the brightest minds in the world. Anne was joyous and always concerned about the issues that affect her colleagues. She knew how to approach a situation without offending either of the party. We will miss you Anne. Rest with the angels.   Sadam Mohammed from Ethiopia  You were a great colleague and your smile face will remain eternally in my memory. Though death is part of every life, it is indeed very painful to hear that you are gone in such tragedy. May the God give your family more strength in this difficult time. RIP Anne     Paul Nduhuura from Uganda  A tribute to a friend and a sister: I met Anne (RIP) for the first time in October 2014 when we both joined PAUWES in Algeria for our master programs as part of the first intake. Though our study programs were different, we attended some common courses together. Moreover, being a part of a small group of pioneer students, we frequently interacted outside the classroom. We dined, talked and laughed a lot together. As a group, we always found a reason to be in each other’s company. Unique to Anne during all this time, was her strong influence on all of us. Whether in class or in social events, Anne always stood out for many reasons, key among them as a natural born leader. Indeed, Anne’s leadership potential did not go unnoticed amongst us her peers. She was chosen as the very first student leader at PAUWES. Throughout the entire first year at PAUWES, I was privileged to serve alongside her as a bridge between the students and the administration. At that time, processes and structures at PAUWES were just starting to evolve. Anne – in her capacity as a student representative – was at the centre of it to advocate for what was best for us, all in a diplomatic and cordial manner. Anne devoted her time, energy and resources, often in long meetings and discussions with the administration and partners, to advance the roots of Pan-Africanism. I dare say that many of the developments that we see today at PAUWES have Anne’s strong footprint in them. PAUWES aside, there’s a lot more that I could say about Anne as a person. I don’t remember any time when I met with her and we parted ways without a hearty laugh. That was Anne’s ‘trademark’. Even during tense and challenging times, her cheerfulness would lighten me up. I will miss her even more for that. Anne also had unmatched intelligence, boldness (she often said, “I don’t mince my words”), an incredibly focused mind and strong sense of belief. Anne knew what she wanted to achieve in life and wouldn’t stop at anything less than her vision. She believed in scaling and exploring the highest heights, casting off stereotypical limitations of race, gender and tradition in the process. This is evident in the fearless decisions that she made and ventures that she undertook. Anne inspired and challenged me in these and many other ways. In her honour and memory, and in as much as I am able, I will challenge myself to advance some of the causes which she believed in. As a friend, the news of Anne’s demise has overwhelmed me so much. Even then, I know that my pain cannot compare to the amount of pain, grief and devastation that you – Anne’s family – have had to endure since you received the terrible news. As you go through this painful period, I would like you to know that, I together with many other friends of Anne in Africa and around the world, are grieving with you. I hope that this tribute can give even the slightest of comfort to you, knowing that you are not alone at this trying moment. As for Anne, she will forever be my friend and sister. I will remember her always. I will miss her. Rest in peace dear Anne. From your son, brother and friend, Paul NDUHUURA   Francis Musyoka from Kenya     Maina Macharia from Kenya  To have met you, interacted with you and shared times together was a great joy and pleasure. You will always be a part of me, fly well Anne, Fly Well to the Almighty.     Osoro George  from Kenya   Faith Natukunda from Uganda Anne, learning of you passing to glory was such a heartbreaking experience. The last news I expected to receive. It brought back various memories of the encounters and good times we had, right from our first meeting at the airport in Istanbul, Turkey on 22nd October 2014; and from that time on, our friendship grew. A beautiful soul, very vibrant and outgoing. A lady of virtue and full of wisdom, that stood her ground no matter the cost. Strove for nothing less than the best, and tolerated no mediocrity. My photo-buddie, you had a laugh would fill a whole room with life, and a smile so contagious. So soon have you departed, but only physically, the memory of you lives on and I continue to hold that so dear. Adieu, mon amie. Rest in eternal peace.   Rehema Maria KHIMULU from Kenya   "On behalf of the PAUWES CoP Team, I would like to offer you and your family our deepest and most sincere condolences, we will surely miss the presence of a truly lovable and kind person. The gorgeous, cheerful and all time shiny smiles, the confident, brilliant and focused person in you will forever be missed. A prayer, a flower, a candle and sad tears of pain for you, our dear sister. May God put you in a special place where you will be watching us, the people who loved and cherished you! No one can prepare you for a loss; it comes like a swift wind. But we take comfort in knowing that you’re now resting with the angels. Words may not suffice to express the heartfelt sorrow that we feel, May your soul rest in eternity." Sincerely,  Brian ODUOR           FARE THEE WELL ANNE!!!                  
    583 Posted by Brian Oduor
  • The tragic Ethiopian Airline, ET-302,  that crushed on Sunday morning of 10th March, 2019, left all the 157 souls lost. Unfortunately, Anne was one of the passengers on board whose life was claimed. Until her demise, she had been enrolled for as an Engineering PhD student at Boku University in Vienna, Austria. Anne Birundi Mogoi was one of the pioneer PAUWES students of the first cohort in the Water Engineering track. She joined PAUWES in 2014 with a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) in Kenya. She was a results-oriented registered Civil Engineer with expertise in Water Resources development projects that focus on Water, Food and Energy Nexus, Sustainable Environment Management, Climate Change, Research, Innovation and Development. Anne was an excellent communicator accustomed to working in teams and individually with a superior eye for detail.She had been involved in the­ design and construction supervision of various water related projects in Kenya and the topographical mapping and planning of Nakuru, Naivasha and Nyeri Counties. Several friends and former PAUWES colleagues sent their tribute messages to mourn her death. Below are some of the tributes: Axel  NGUEDIA NGUEDOUNG from Cameroon  It is so sad to write to express this thought. I did not know that I could ever experience once more such a pain. Definitely, good things never stay for long!!! I find it very difficult to write these words as I did not expect in all scenarios in the past weeks writing words for such occasion. “The Lord has given, the Lord has taken”, but He gave us the opportunity to meet you, to know you, to enjoy the person you have been. We have just spent this small time together, but we’ve shared so much. I have found in you a colleague, a friend, a sister. There is so much to say on you but to keep it short, I will miss your smile, your joy, your fraternal warmth, your ambition and advices as person, sister. I cannot stop seeing picture of you smiling with these unique gestures. You are no more with us physically, but you will remain in our earth forever. I pray that the Almighty Lord welcomes you in his home and let you watch on us while smiling with the Angels up there!!! Go and rest in Peace Dada yangu!!!       Astride Mélaine ADJINACOU GNAHOUI from Cotonou, Benin For you my lovely Anna, May the name of the Lord be glorified. He gave you to us, He called you back. Anna, I just want to tell you that I am so deeply sorry because I didn't use to tell you how much you were hearty and a lovely person for me. Sorry Anne. You entered my life on 23rd of October 2014. We were to start our Master studies in Algeria in Tlemcen. We used to do our assignments together. Thank you for helping me a lot in English. Thank you for always remember my birthday. Thank you for going to church with me together sometimes. Thank you for fighting for our rights in Tlemcen. I remember when on a Thursday, we had an issue together, you came back to see me on Friday and said you were sorry about it. Thank you for being so hearty and forgive me to have not been all the time kind. Thank you for being so caring for me when I was sick in October 2015. You cleaned my room, prepare bathroom for me, checked on me until I recovered. Oh my God! Thank you Anna. My dear Anna, when you laugh, we could hear it from far.   You were so full of joy. I cannot even imagine how you will miss your parents. There is this big whole in my heart. If only I knew that God would call you back to him so early, I would have called you just to hear this laughing of yours. You were so intelligent and enthusiastic. My Anna, I blessed God for your life. You were an Heroine and I think you just go as an Heroine. I can never ever, never ever forget you. I continually pray for, ordering holy Mass for you my Anna, my sister from another mother. Condole yourself your parents and protect them from where you are, now you are even so shinning in the Stars. I believe you are one of the most beautiful of them. Blessings upon your family. I love you my friend. I do. Rest in God's peace my beautiful sister.   Devotha NSHIMIYIMANA  from Rwanda Dear Anne, It broke my heart to lose you but I know that no matter what you will always be with us. Even though your beautiful smile and laughter are gone forever, I will forever cherish your memories. Your constant support, your big heart and incredible personality that always look the best for everyone will forever live in my memories. Oh Anne, you are sadly missed but never forgotten.    Clarisse NIBAGWIRE  NISHIMWE from Rwanda   Ismael Jumare from Nigeria  It is really shocking to have received the sad news of the Ethiopian plane crash, which claimed the life of our beloved sister in the PAUWES family i.e. Anne Mogoi Birundu and other lives. Anne has been a morally sound, friendly and intelligent personality, and a great asset to Africa. So, it is indeed a great loss. I therefore, kindly pass my condolence to the family for the irreplaceable loss. May God comfort you all in your trying moments. Sincerely, Ismail Abubakar Jumare  Kay Nyaboe from Kenya   Lilies Kathambi from Kenya     Nabil KHORCHANI from Tunisia                                                                Nana Safiatu from Bukina Faso  "Verily to Allah, belongs what He took and to Him belongs what He gave". Anne was more than a classmate. Her good heart was abundant of love and empathy for every one of us. A humble sister who always cared and supported me during our years of studies in Tlemcen and even after.  Her personality taught me wisdom, humility and faith. I will always remember Anne’s kindness and that special glowing smile which was contagious with anyone she met. May Allah receive Anne's beautiful soul in Heaven and give her peace and eternal life. Lord, comfort us all bereaved ones, the family and friends, as we go through this huge loss.   Albert Khamala from Kenya  Madam President, as I fondly referred to You at PAUWES, indeed Anne was a great leader with all attributes of an excellent leader. In Anne, I saw Prof. Wangari Mathaai reborn, the love for humanity and natural resources. The world has lost a rare personality with strong heart and mentality. Anne, although gone, your spirit of Pan African Integration will forever live. We love you Anne, bye bye Anne. I will miss your strong heart, contiguous smile and laughter.   Kennedy Okuku from Kenya  We have lost one of the brightest minds in the world. Anne was joyous and always concerned about the issues that affect her colleagues. She knew how to approach a situation without offending either of the party. We will miss you Anne. Rest with the angels.   Sadam Mohammed from Ethiopia  You were a great colleague and your smile face will remain eternally in my memory. Though death is part of every life, it is indeed very painful to hear that you are gone in such tragedy. May the God give your family more strength in this difficult time. RIP Anne     Paul Nduhuura from Uganda  A tribute to a friend and a sister: I met Anne (RIP) for the first time in October 2014 when we both joined PAUWES in Algeria for our master programs as part of the first intake. Though our study programs were different, we attended some common courses together. Moreover, being a part of a small group of pioneer students, we frequently interacted outside the classroom. We dined, talked and laughed a lot together. As a group, we always found a reason to be in each other’s company. Unique to Anne during all this time, was her strong influence on all of us. Whether in class or in social events, Anne always stood out for many reasons, key among them as a natural born leader. Indeed, Anne’s leadership potential did not go unnoticed amongst us her peers. She was chosen as the very first student leader at PAUWES. Throughout the entire first year at PAUWES, I was privileged to serve alongside her as a bridge between the students and the administration. At that time, processes and structures at PAUWES were just starting to evolve. Anne – in her capacity as a student representative – was at the centre of it to advocate for what was best for us, all in a diplomatic and cordial manner. Anne devoted her time, energy and resources, often in long meetings and discussions with the administration and partners, to advance the roots of Pan-Africanism. I dare say that many of the developments that we see today at PAUWES have Anne’s strong footprint in them. PAUWES aside, there’s a lot more that I could say about Anne as a person. I don’t remember any time when I met with her and we parted ways without a hearty laugh. That was Anne’s ‘trademark’. Even during tense and challenging times, her cheerfulness would lighten me up. I will miss her even more for that. Anne also had unmatched intelligence, boldness (she often said, “I don’t mince my words”), an incredibly focused mind and strong sense of belief. Anne knew what she wanted to achieve in life and wouldn’t stop at anything less than her vision. She believed in scaling and exploring the highest heights, casting off stereotypical limitations of race, gender and tradition in the process. This is evident in the fearless decisions that she made and ventures that she undertook. Anne inspired and challenged me in these and many other ways. In her honour and memory, and in as much as I am able, I will challenge myself to advance some of the causes which she believed in. As a friend, the news of Anne’s demise has overwhelmed me so much. Even then, I know that my pain cannot compare to the amount of pain, grief and devastation that you – Anne’s family – have had to endure since you received the terrible news. As you go through this painful period, I would like you to know that, I together with many other friends of Anne in Africa and around the world, are grieving with you. I hope that this tribute can give even the slightest of comfort to you, knowing that you are not alone at this trying moment. As for Anne, she will forever be my friend and sister. I will remember her always. I will miss her. Rest in peace dear Anne. From your son, brother and friend, Paul NDUHUURA   Francis Musyoka from Kenya     Maina Macharia from Kenya  To have met you, interacted with you and shared times together was a great joy and pleasure. You will always be a part of me, fly well Anne, Fly Well to the Almighty.     Osoro George  from Kenya   Faith Natukunda from Uganda Anne, learning of you passing to glory was such a heartbreaking experience. The last news I expected to receive. It brought back various memories of the encounters and good times we had, right from our first meeting at the airport in Istanbul, Turkey on 22nd October 2014; and from that time on, our friendship grew. A beautiful soul, very vibrant and outgoing. A lady of virtue and full of wisdom, that stood her ground no matter the cost. Strove for nothing less than the best, and tolerated no mediocrity. My photo-buddie, you had a laugh would fill a whole room with life, and a smile so contagious. So soon have you departed, but only physically, the memory of you lives on and I continue to hold that so dear. Adieu, mon amie. Rest in eternal peace.   Rehema Maria KHIMULU from Kenya   "On behalf of the PAUWES CoP Team, I would like to offer you and your family our deepest and most sincere condolences, we will surely miss the presence of a truly lovable and kind person. The gorgeous, cheerful and all time shiny smiles, the confident, brilliant and focused person in you will forever be missed. A prayer, a flower, a candle and sad tears of pain for you, our dear sister. May God put you in a special place where you will be watching us, the people who loved and cherished you! No one can prepare you for a loss; it comes like a swift wind. But we take comfort in knowing that you’re now resting with the angels. Words may not suffice to express the heartfelt sorrow that we feel, May your soul rest in eternity." Sincerely,  Brian ODUOR           FARE THEE WELL ANNE!!!                  
    Mar 25, 2019 583
  • 09 Mar 2019
    PEIC is a students' club at PAUWES  that enables an environment for students to develop entrepreneurial and innovative mindset to solve real life problems. On 6th March 2019, it held its magniflorious event of transferring the instruments of leadership from the 4th cohort team to the 5th cohort. The magnificent event was graced by powerful speeches from the career service and Entrepreneurship Officer, The Assistant Research coordinator, the outgoing President and the current president. As members of the club, the event was highly honored by Pauwes students. The need for Entrepreneurship and Innovation to solve the current problems like unemployment, poverty, food insecurity among others on the African continent was emphasized. The event was finalised by a mouth-watering lunch  that enabled further interactions between the outgoing and incoming leaders as well as PAUWES staff and club members.
    915 Posted by Bwambale Joash
  • PEIC is a students' club at PAUWES  that enables an environment for students to develop entrepreneurial and innovative mindset to solve real life problems. On 6th March 2019, it held its magniflorious event of transferring the instruments of leadership from the 4th cohort team to the 5th cohort. The magnificent event was graced by powerful speeches from the career service and Entrepreneurship Officer, The Assistant Research coordinator, the outgoing President and the current president. As members of the club, the event was highly honored by Pauwes students. The need for Entrepreneurship and Innovation to solve the current problems like unemployment, poverty, food insecurity among others on the African continent was emphasized. The event was finalised by a mouth-watering lunch  that enabled further interactions between the outgoing and incoming leaders as well as PAUWES staff and club members.
    Mar 09, 2019 915
  • 20 Feb 2019
    The Pan African University in its continuous pursuit of excellence is hosting a curricula review workshop. Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/PAUWES) to get details of each presenter and topics addressed to improve the Africa’s higher learning Institutions. Below is a list of keynote speakers at the curricula review workshop. Prof. Kassa BELAY, Rector, Pan African University Prof. Kebir BOUCHERIT, Rector, University of Tlemcen Prof Abdellatif ZERGA, Director, PAUWES Prof Joseph MUTALE, University of Manchester Dr. Nina VOLLES BIRD, GIZ Representative to Tlemcen Angela COETZEE, Sustainability Institute Germany # CoP #PAUWES #CurriculaReview       
    135 Posted by Anthony Osinde
  • The Pan African University in its continuous pursuit of excellence is hosting a curricula review workshop. Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/PAUWES) to get details of each presenter and topics addressed to improve the Africa’s higher learning Institutions. Below is a list of keynote speakers at the curricula review workshop. Prof. Kassa BELAY, Rector, Pan African University Prof. Kebir BOUCHERIT, Rector, University of Tlemcen Prof Abdellatif ZERGA, Director, PAUWES Prof Joseph MUTALE, University of Manchester Dr. Nina VOLLES BIRD, GIZ Representative to Tlemcen Angela COETZEE, Sustainability Institute Germany # CoP #PAUWES #CurriculaReview       
    Feb 20, 2019 135
  • 29 Jan 2019
    Australia Is Baking And Chicago Is Freezing - What Is Going On? By Dr. Marshall J. Sherphard I often remind people that Earth has a split personality. As the Northern Hemisphere experiences winter, it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere. People can be so narrowly focused on where they live that they overlook this fact. It caught my eye that we are currently seeing extreme temperatures on both sides of the ledger right now. Chicago, Illinois is expected to deal with life-threatening and record cold air this week. On the other side of the planet, Adelaide and other parts of Australia are shattering heat records. What is going on? Surface temperatures for Sunday January 27th on Earth.CLIMATE REANALYZER.ORG Chicago is often referred to as the Windy City, but this coming week extreme cold makes its claim for the headlines. According to a CNN wire story on the KDVR.com website, The forecast models the weather service is referring to have consistently shown numerous days dropping to at least minus-20 degrees or colder next week. For reference, Chicago has had only 15 days ever drop to minus-20 or colder in 150 years of record keeping. There is also the potential that Chicago will see multiple days that fail to reach 0 for the high temperature — something that has happened only twice in the past 20 years, and 22 times in the past 100 years.   Life-threatening temperatures in the Chicago area this week.NWS CHICAGO VIA TWITTER The National Weather Service-Chicago tweeted the graphic above warning of life-threatening cold and wind chills in the middle of the work week. What's the cause? It is winter. Because of increasingly infrequent extreme cold events, these events definitely get our attention as they should. Meteorologically speaking,  after a low-pressure system brings wintry precipitation to the Midwest United States, a very cold Arctic high pressure system (1040 mb) system settles into the northern Plains by midweek. The low-pressure system is projected to be near the Great Lakes by Wednesday. Meteorology 101 tells us that the circulation around a High is clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, and the circulation associate with low pressure is counterclockwise. This means the flow pattern and a difference in pressure (a gradient) will cause cold air to spill into the region along with gusty winds. If you look at the weather map for Wednesday (bel0w), you can see some of these features. To visualize the cold stream of air that will flow into the Midwest, simply follow those red lines of constant pressure (isobars).   Weather map for Wednesday January 30thNWS WPC Because the Earth's Northern Hemisphere is tilting away from the Sun right now,  it is winter there. The Southern Hemisphere is receiving more direct, intense energy from our star and is experiencing summer. A graduate school colleague of mine, Richard Henning reminded me, in his social media post, of a lyric from the song "Beds are Burning."  In that song, the Australian rock band, Midnight Oil, sings of "steam in forty five degrees." Adelaide, Australia broke an 80-year heat record with a temperature of 46.6 deg C this past week. That value converts to 115.9 deg F. The Bureau of Meteorology, South Australia tweeted on January 24th: #Adelaide is now the hottest capital in Australia, having just reached 46.6C at 3:35pm, beating the previous record in #Melbourne of 46.4 @BOM_Vic More records: Whyalla 48.5 (prev. record 48.0), Leigh Creek 46.9 (prev. 46.3), and Port Augusta 49.1 (prev. 48.9) #heatwave Temperatures for January 27th, 2019.AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY Many experts are projecting this to be the warmest January on record in parts of Australia as a brutal heatwave continues. The current heatwave has led to health emergencies, energy crises, fire hazards, and disruptions of the Australian Open tennis tournament. A stagnant area of high pressure situated over southern Australia means sinking, warming air and dry conditions. Ironically, a recent report issued by Australian government warns of increasing threats from such heatwaves. The 5th biennial State of the Climate report declared that: Australia's climate has warmed just over 1 °C since 1910 leading to an increase in the frequency of extreme heat events...There has been a long-term increase in extreme fire weather, and in the length of the fire season, across large parts of Australia. The report also warns of more hot days, heat waves and fewer cool extremes. Earth is clearly exhibiting its seasonal and hemispheric split personality, but there is something that I want to point out as I close. Extreme events are what we notice not averages. Isn't it ironic that it has become breaking news when it gets cold in Chicago? This is consistent with scientific literature that finds "extreme cold" events becoming less common. Will they continue to happen? Of course. We must look at weather extremes and climate within the proper context. There are many people that draw conclusions based on what is happening where they live or on a given day. That's a no-no. Stay warm Chicago (or cool Adelaide).   Dr. Marshall Shepherd, Dir., Atmospheric Sciences Program/GA Athletic Assoc. Distinguished Professor (Univ of Georgia), Host, Weather Channel's Popular Podcast, Weather Geeks, 2013 AMS President Dr. J. Marshall Shepherd, a leading international expert in weather and climate, was the 2013 President of American Meteorological Society (AMS) and is Director of the University of Georgia’s (UGA) Atmospheric Sciences Program. Dr. Shepherd is the Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor and hosts The Weather Channel’s Weather Geeks Podcast, which can be found at all podcast outlets. Prior to UGA, Dr. Shepherd spent 12 years as a Research Meteorologist at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center and was Deputy Project Scientist for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. In 2004, he was honored at the White House with a prestigious PECASE award. He also has received major honors from the American Meteorological Society, American Association of Geographers, and the Captain Planet Foundation. Shepherd is frequently sought as an expert on weather and climate by major media outlets, the White House, and Congress. He has over 80 peer-reviewed scholarly publications and numerous editorials. Dr. Shepherd received his B.S., M.S. and PhD in physical meteorology from Florida State University.
    212 Posted by Brian Oduor
  • Australia Is Baking And Chicago Is Freezing - What Is Going On? By Dr. Marshall J. Sherphard I often remind people that Earth has a split personality. As the Northern Hemisphere experiences winter, it is summer in the Southern Hemisphere. People can be so narrowly focused on where they live that they overlook this fact. It caught my eye that we are currently seeing extreme temperatures on both sides of the ledger right now. Chicago, Illinois is expected to deal with life-threatening and record cold air this week. On the other side of the planet, Adelaide and other parts of Australia are shattering heat records. What is going on? Surface temperatures for Sunday January 27th on Earth.CLIMATE REANALYZER.ORG Chicago is often referred to as the Windy City, but this coming week extreme cold makes its claim for the headlines. According to a CNN wire story on the KDVR.com website, The forecast models the weather service is referring to have consistently shown numerous days dropping to at least minus-20 degrees or colder next week. For reference, Chicago has had only 15 days ever drop to minus-20 or colder in 150 years of record keeping. There is also the potential that Chicago will see multiple days that fail to reach 0 for the high temperature — something that has happened only twice in the past 20 years, and 22 times in the past 100 years.   Life-threatening temperatures in the Chicago area this week.NWS CHICAGO VIA TWITTER The National Weather Service-Chicago tweeted the graphic above warning of life-threatening cold and wind chills in the middle of the work week. What's the cause? It is winter. Because of increasingly infrequent extreme cold events, these events definitely get our attention as they should. Meteorologically speaking,  after a low-pressure system brings wintry precipitation to the Midwest United States, a very cold Arctic high pressure system (1040 mb) system settles into the northern Plains by midweek. The low-pressure system is projected to be near the Great Lakes by Wednesday. Meteorology 101 tells us that the circulation around a High is clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, and the circulation associate with low pressure is counterclockwise. This means the flow pattern and a difference in pressure (a gradient) will cause cold air to spill into the region along with gusty winds. If you look at the weather map for Wednesday (bel0w), you can see some of these features. To visualize the cold stream of air that will flow into the Midwest, simply follow those red lines of constant pressure (isobars).   Weather map for Wednesday January 30thNWS WPC Because the Earth's Northern Hemisphere is tilting away from the Sun right now,  it is winter there. The Southern Hemisphere is receiving more direct, intense energy from our star and is experiencing summer. A graduate school colleague of mine, Richard Henning reminded me, in his social media post, of a lyric from the song "Beds are Burning."  In that song, the Australian rock band, Midnight Oil, sings of "steam in forty five degrees." Adelaide, Australia broke an 80-year heat record with a temperature of 46.6 deg C this past week. That value converts to 115.9 deg F. The Bureau of Meteorology, South Australia tweeted on January 24th: #Adelaide is now the hottest capital in Australia, having just reached 46.6C at 3:35pm, beating the previous record in #Melbourne of 46.4 @BOM_Vic More records: Whyalla 48.5 (prev. record 48.0), Leigh Creek 46.9 (prev. 46.3), and Port Augusta 49.1 (prev. 48.9) #heatwave Temperatures for January 27th, 2019.AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY Many experts are projecting this to be the warmest January on record in parts of Australia as a brutal heatwave continues. The current heatwave has led to health emergencies, energy crises, fire hazards, and disruptions of the Australian Open tennis tournament. A stagnant area of high pressure situated over southern Australia means sinking, warming air and dry conditions. Ironically, a recent report issued by Australian government warns of increasing threats from such heatwaves. The 5th biennial State of the Climate report declared that: Australia's climate has warmed just over 1 °C since 1910 leading to an increase in the frequency of extreme heat events...There has been a long-term increase in extreme fire weather, and in the length of the fire season, across large parts of Australia. The report also warns of more hot days, heat waves and fewer cool extremes. Earth is clearly exhibiting its seasonal and hemispheric split personality, but there is something that I want to point out as I close. Extreme events are what we notice not averages. Isn't it ironic that it has become breaking news when it gets cold in Chicago? This is consistent with scientific literature that finds "extreme cold" events becoming less common. Will they continue to happen? Of course. We must look at weather extremes and climate within the proper context. There are many people that draw conclusions based on what is happening where they live or on a given day. That's a no-no. Stay warm Chicago (or cool Adelaide).   Dr. Marshall Shepherd, Dir., Atmospheric Sciences Program/GA Athletic Assoc. Distinguished Professor (Univ of Georgia), Host, Weather Channel's Popular Podcast, Weather Geeks, 2013 AMS President Dr. J. Marshall Shepherd, a leading international expert in weather and climate, was the 2013 President of American Meteorological Society (AMS) and is Director of the University of Georgia’s (UGA) Atmospheric Sciences Program. Dr. Shepherd is the Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor and hosts The Weather Channel’s Weather Geeks Podcast, which can be found at all podcast outlets. Prior to UGA, Dr. Shepherd spent 12 years as a Research Meteorologist at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center and was Deputy Project Scientist for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. In 2004, he was honored at the White House with a prestigious PECASE award. He also has received major honors from the American Meteorological Society, American Association of Geographers, and the Captain Planet Foundation. Shepherd is frequently sought as an expert on weather and climate by major media outlets, the White House, and Congress. He has over 80 peer-reviewed scholarly publications and numerous editorials. Dr. Shepherd received his B.S., M.S. and PhD in physical meteorology from Florida State University.
    Jan 29, 2019 212
  • 03 Aug 2018
    As part of the activity of the summer school on renewable energy systems organized by the Institute for Technology and Resources Management in the Tropics and Subtropics (ITT) a delegation of students and professors from Mali’s University of Bamako recently visited UNU-EHS. You can read the news on the UNU-EHS website, ITT website, and check the pictures of the event here.      
    874 Posted by Fausto Saltetti
  • As part of the activity of the summer school on renewable energy systems organized by the Institute for Technology and Resources Management in the Tropics and Subtropics (ITT) a delegation of students and professors from Mali’s University of Bamako recently visited UNU-EHS. You can read the news on the UNU-EHS website, ITT website, and check the pictures of the event here.      
    Aug 03, 2018 874
  • 13 Feb 2017
    Every week we go to the market to buy groceries and this past week was no different. We mostly almost know what we are buying because frankly the choices are quite limited. One of my favourite things to do is picking cauliflower because of its colour and the contrast it gives in the sea of green and red vegetables. However, I could not make up my mind this week. The cauliflowers looked unhealthy and they had started yellowing and none appealed to me. I remember standing there and not wanting to make a choice and Diana insisting that her hands were full (how this related to making a choice is beyond me but I digress) and I needed to make up my mind. I did finally make a choice of 2 but I was not pleased with what we took home. I am almost sure other customers experienced my dilemma because according to a research done by Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) food at the retail level is mostly bought because it looks good. That which does not appeal to the customers is left to rot or pulled off the shelves. It is no wonder then that a third of the food produced in the world goes to waste post harvest translating to 1.3 billion tons of food every year (FAO, 2011). A quarter of this wasted food could be used to feed approximately 900 million of the world hungry. This wastefulness does not begin at the retail or consumer level but starts with the farmer sorting, storing and transporting their produce. Research shows that farmers in developing countries lose as much as 15% of their income to post-harvest loss. The impact extends to water resources with around 25% of global fresh water and a fifth of farm land being used to grow crops that are never eaten.  These figures are staggering considering most of these wastage can be easily corrected through attitude and behavior change. Another solution lies in governments providing a suitable environment for innovations on ways to conserve food for longer periods and regulating market standards. Every time I have been to the market I have always noticed vegetables going bad and by now Diana considers my voiced concern as a rhetorical question. Unfortunately, this is not an issue that is unique to Algeria but something I have witnessed in the different countries I have visited as I am sure most of you would attest. It always baffles me that so much food goes to waste and is pulled down the shelves for disposal while we have so many people starving in our societies. France however is working towards changing this status quo through the introduction of legislation that requires retailers to donate unsold food or face a fine of 4,230 dollars. Other European countries like Germany, Britain and Denmark have also made strides in the reduction of food wastage. In Cologne for instance a “waste supermarket” was opened at the beginning of the month where only salvaged food is sold and consumers determine the price of the products. The owner of the store in an interview with DW confessed her aim was not so much as her selling food that would otherwise be considered waste but to stimulate a conversation on how much food the Germans waste and promote behavior change. On the other side of the globe the Kenyan president declared drought as a national disaster with the Kenya Red Cross estimating that 2.7 million people are facing starvation. It saddens me that we continue to lose lives and livestock because we cannot feed our population. The  more I think about it the more I become disgusted at our society that is so profit driven that you would rather have produce rot at the shelves or farms than donate it to the needy and at our government for failing to act in a timely manner. If we are to achieve the sustainable development goal 2 on Zero hunger by 2030 we not only need to promote sustainable agricultural practices but consumption habits as well. The governments need to come up with penalties to discourage retail wastage and drive awareness campaigns to change the way consumers view food and the consequences of food wastage for the rest of the population and the ecosystem.   Useful Links http://www.fao.org/docrep/014/mb060e/mb060e.pdf http://www.dw.com/en/france-battles-food-waste-by-law/a-19148931 http://www.dw.com/en/first-german-supermarket-sells-waste-food-only/a-37426777
    1956 Posted by Eva Kimonye
  • Every week we go to the market to buy groceries and this past week was no different. We mostly almost know what we are buying because frankly the choices are quite limited. One of my favourite things to do is picking cauliflower because of its colour and the contrast it gives in the sea of green and red vegetables. However, I could not make up my mind this week. The cauliflowers looked unhealthy and they had started yellowing and none appealed to me. I remember standing there and not wanting to make a choice and Diana insisting that her hands were full (how this related to making a choice is beyond me but I digress) and I needed to make up my mind. I did finally make a choice of 2 but I was not pleased with what we took home. I am almost sure other customers experienced my dilemma because according to a research done by Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) food at the retail level is mostly bought because it looks good. That which does not appeal to the customers is left to rot or pulled off the shelves. It is no wonder then that a third of the food produced in the world goes to waste post harvest translating to 1.3 billion tons of food every year (FAO, 2011). A quarter of this wasted food could be used to feed approximately 900 million of the world hungry. This wastefulness does not begin at the retail or consumer level but starts with the farmer sorting, storing and transporting their produce. Research shows that farmers in developing countries lose as much as 15% of their income to post-harvest loss. The impact extends to water resources with around 25% of global fresh water and a fifth of farm land being used to grow crops that are never eaten.  These figures are staggering considering most of these wastage can be easily corrected through attitude and behavior change. Another solution lies in governments providing a suitable environment for innovations on ways to conserve food for longer periods and regulating market standards. Every time I have been to the market I have always noticed vegetables going bad and by now Diana considers my voiced concern as a rhetorical question. Unfortunately, this is not an issue that is unique to Algeria but something I have witnessed in the different countries I have visited as I am sure most of you would attest. It always baffles me that so much food goes to waste and is pulled down the shelves for disposal while we have so many people starving in our societies. France however is working towards changing this status quo through the introduction of legislation that requires retailers to donate unsold food or face a fine of 4,230 dollars. Other European countries like Germany, Britain and Denmark have also made strides in the reduction of food wastage. In Cologne for instance a “waste supermarket” was opened at the beginning of the month where only salvaged food is sold and consumers determine the price of the products. The owner of the store in an interview with DW confessed her aim was not so much as her selling food that would otherwise be considered waste but to stimulate a conversation on how much food the Germans waste and promote behavior change. On the other side of the globe the Kenyan president declared drought as a national disaster with the Kenya Red Cross estimating that 2.7 million people are facing starvation. It saddens me that we continue to lose lives and livestock because we cannot feed our population. The  more I think about it the more I become disgusted at our society that is so profit driven that you would rather have produce rot at the shelves or farms than donate it to the needy and at our government for failing to act in a timely manner. If we are to achieve the sustainable development goal 2 on Zero hunger by 2030 we not only need to promote sustainable agricultural practices but consumption habits as well. The governments need to come up with penalties to discourage retail wastage and drive awareness campaigns to change the way consumers view food and the consequences of food wastage for the rest of the population and the ecosystem.   Useful Links http://www.fao.org/docrep/014/mb060e/mb060e.pdf http://www.dw.com/en/france-battles-food-waste-by-law/a-19148931 http://www.dw.com/en/first-german-supermarket-sells-waste-food-only/a-37426777
    Feb 13, 2017 1956
  • 06 Feb 2017
    Last year we all took a module in African history and it was very enlightening and bore very lively discussions ranging from pre and post colonial Africa. Our professor was German which made most of us wonder if there was no African professor available to tell the African story. However, those hang ups were quickly forgotten and I can honestly say it was one of my best classes by far. Among the class assignments was group discussions and my colleagues and I were to discuss the politics of autochthony. Now, do not get lost in the jargon that is the word autochthony. It simply means the right to belong. According to Geschiere, 2009 autochthony seeks to establish an irrefutable primordial right to belong and is a tactic used by mostly politicians to exclude outsiders. The term was introduced to Africa by the French in the 1900’s in an effort to gain control over different groups and communities. They were therefore able to use it as a divide and rule tactic between the communities that confronted them in the territories they conquered. In recent past the politics of belonging have been used by authoritarian regimes to divide the opposition and neutralize the effects of multi-parties in the continent. Its manifestation is demonstrated through high levels of intolerance and hostility towards “strangers” who are seen as a threat or competition in access to limited resources. The xenophobia cases in South Africa are a perfect example where the fear is manifested among the lower level workers and the wealthy groups. Cases in xenophobic violence escalated rapidly after the end of the apartheid regime despite the anti-discrimination passages in the post apartheid regime which tried to introduce the idea of multi culturalism and nationalism. Sadly, the xenophobic flare ups continue to happen so often in South Africa leading to loss of lives and property for those who are considered as outsiders. After Henri Konan took office in Cote d’ivoire in 1993 he began to question the citizenship of individuals from the North. During this period citizens became “foreigners” if they did not have one parent who was born in Cote d’ivoire. By 1998 the law prohibited the “foreigners” from owning land, voting or running for public office. His predecessor General Robert Guei continued the xenophobic policies that targeted the northern Muslim minority. They were subjected to large scale human rights violation, rape, killings and discriminated against based on the way they dressed. Sadly, South Africa and Cote d’ivoire are not unique cases and the politics of belonging have been demonstrated across the continent for instance with the Nubians in Kenya and Bamileke in Cameroon to mention just a few. Curiously, the Greek meaning for autochthony means “springing from the land” which would explain why it’s politics is tied to land and the soil in the African context. The final ritual in the politics of autochthony is the burial where the dead have to be buried in their ancestral home. We may however feel far removed from these cases and yet we continue to drive the trend unknowingly. In my country, there is a popular phrase that politicians like to use whenever they are held accountable for  abuse of office. “My people are being attacked” is used to evade accountability for abuse of office and misuse of public funds. Yet this tactic continues to work in favour of the politicians by dividing the country in regions and along tribal lines. In conclusion, the politics of autochthony continue to divide the continent along tribal lines. We have allowed ourselves to be manipulated and we continue to isolate people based on religion, tribe, clans and their country of origin. Yet what value does it add to us? We miss the opportunity to learn from other cultures and find a middle ground to work together for social and economic development and well being. The vacuum left is what the politicians have filled with the politics of belonging and we continue to buy into the ideology.      References Legum, C. & Mmari G.R.V. (1995). Mwalimu: the influence of Nyerere Geschiere, P. (2009). The perils of belonging: Autochthony, citizenship, and exclusion in Africa and Europe. University of Chicago Press Jennings, M., & Mercer, C. (2011). Rehabilitating nationalisms: conviviality and national consciousness in postcolonial Tanzania. Politique Africaine, 121, 87-106. Saha, Santosh C. The politics of ethnicity and national identity. Peter Lang, 2007.
    648 Posted by Eva Kimonye
  • Last year we all took a module in African history and it was very enlightening and bore very lively discussions ranging from pre and post colonial Africa. Our professor was German which made most of us wonder if there was no African professor available to tell the African story. However, those hang ups were quickly forgotten and I can honestly say it was one of my best classes by far. Among the class assignments was group discussions and my colleagues and I were to discuss the politics of autochthony. Now, do not get lost in the jargon that is the word autochthony. It simply means the right to belong. According to Geschiere, 2009 autochthony seeks to establish an irrefutable primordial right to belong and is a tactic used by mostly politicians to exclude outsiders. The term was introduced to Africa by the French in the 1900’s in an effort to gain control over different groups and communities. They were therefore able to use it as a divide and rule tactic between the communities that confronted them in the territories they conquered. In recent past the politics of belonging have been used by authoritarian regimes to divide the opposition and neutralize the effects of multi-parties in the continent. Its manifestation is demonstrated through high levels of intolerance and hostility towards “strangers” who are seen as a threat or competition in access to limited resources. The xenophobia cases in South Africa are a perfect example where the fear is manifested among the lower level workers and the wealthy groups. Cases in xenophobic violence escalated rapidly after the end of the apartheid regime despite the anti-discrimination passages in the post apartheid regime which tried to introduce the idea of multi culturalism and nationalism. Sadly, the xenophobic flare ups continue to happen so often in South Africa leading to loss of lives and property for those who are considered as outsiders. After Henri Konan took office in Cote d’ivoire in 1993 he began to question the citizenship of individuals from the North. During this period citizens became “foreigners” if they did not have one parent who was born in Cote d’ivoire. By 1998 the law prohibited the “foreigners” from owning land, voting or running for public office. His predecessor General Robert Guei continued the xenophobic policies that targeted the northern Muslim minority. They were subjected to large scale human rights violation, rape, killings and discriminated against based on the way they dressed. Sadly, South Africa and Cote d’ivoire are not unique cases and the politics of belonging have been demonstrated across the continent for instance with the Nubians in Kenya and Bamileke in Cameroon to mention just a few. Curiously, the Greek meaning for autochthony means “springing from the land” which would explain why it’s politics is tied to land and the soil in the African context. The final ritual in the politics of autochthony is the burial where the dead have to be buried in their ancestral home. We may however feel far removed from these cases and yet we continue to drive the trend unknowingly. In my country, there is a popular phrase that politicians like to use whenever they are held accountable for  abuse of office. “My people are being attacked” is used to evade accountability for abuse of office and misuse of public funds. Yet this tactic continues to work in favour of the politicians by dividing the country in regions and along tribal lines. In conclusion, the politics of autochthony continue to divide the continent along tribal lines. We have allowed ourselves to be manipulated and we continue to isolate people based on religion, tribe, clans and their country of origin. Yet what value does it add to us? We miss the opportunity to learn from other cultures and find a middle ground to work together for social and economic development and well being. The vacuum left is what the politicians have filled with the politics of belonging and we continue to buy into the ideology.      References Legum, C. & Mmari G.R.V. (1995). Mwalimu: the influence of Nyerere Geschiere, P. (2009). The perils of belonging: Autochthony, citizenship, and exclusion in Africa and Europe. University of Chicago Press Jennings, M., & Mercer, C. (2011). Rehabilitating nationalisms: conviviality and national consciousness in postcolonial Tanzania. Politique Africaine, 121, 87-106. Saha, Santosh C. The politics of ethnicity and national identity. Peter Lang, 2007.
    Feb 06, 2017 648
  • 30 Jan 2017
    I am currently taking a unit on flood and drought management and it is interesting to say the least but that is a story for another day. However, this module hits home for me because Kenya is currently going through a very dry season. The water reservoirs and hydro-dams are running below half capacity and those that live in the arid and semi-arid lands are in dire need of food relief. Their livestock which is their sole source of livelihood has not been spared either and the owners have to walk for long distances in search of water and pasture. What shocks me even more is that the country is hoping that the expected long rains in April will solve this crisis. I am always left wondering why we have a meteorological department when occurrences like drought and flood seem to catch us unprepared every single year. Kenya is prone to frequent drought occurrences especially in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) that cover 80% of its territory. The ASALs are home to an estimated 11 million people and 70% of the national livestock herd. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries Strategic plan 2013-2017, livestock keeping accounts for approximately 90% of the employment opportunities and nearly 95% of family incomes in the ASALs. In these areas the annual rainfall is in the range of 200 to 500mm and experience frequent droughts and heat waves (Kandji, 2006). Livestock exposure to heat waves increases their vulnerability to diseases directly affecting their reproductive health and meat and milk production which the ASALs communities heavily rely on for food and income (FAO, 2016).The further vulnerability of Kenya to climate change and temperature projections suggesting a rise of 2.5°C between 2000 to 2050 present these communities with the challenge of ensuring food security, access to water and dealing with livestock diseases. The above challenges call for the development of effective adaptation strategies to minimize the effect of climate change and variability on the livelihoods of the people living in ASALs (Bobadoye A.O, 2016). The current approaches and strategies need to be changed in order to build resilience and adaptation capacity among the affected communities (Bobadoye A.O, 2016; Nicholas Ozor, 2011). These communities will be required to embrace new skills and attitudes through knowledge transfer and capacity building a role that can be effectively filled by extension agents (Nicholas Ozor, 2011). Extension agents have influence towards the decisions made by farmers and pastoralists and they therefore play a very important role in the interpretation of climate change and variability research and providing information on adaptation measures necessary to the affected communities (Bobadoye A.O, 2016; Emily Susko, 2013). Adaptation to the impacts of climate change and variability is crucial in protecting the livelihoods and in ensuring food security among the pastoralist communities (Dagmawi M. Abegaz, 2014). There is some acknowledgement by the government on the important role of extension agencies in the agricultural sector. However the livestock subsector only has 20% of the required staff quota making service delivery difficult. All these factors have created a gap in knowledge transfer and capacity development leading to dire consequences. It has not only posed a threat to food security but also presented a new set of challenges in accessing animal feed, water, exposing the livestock to diseases and heat stress and to the general economy with livestock estimated to contribute 5.5% of the country’s GDP (Ministry of Agriculture, 2015). According to the (ILRI, 2015) Corporate Report 2014-2015, Kenya lost USD 3.3 billon in the livestock sector due to drought between 2008 and 2011. As a result pastoralists continue to be pushed deep in poverty due to livestock losses which are their main source of livelihood. In conclusion the changes in climate call for the adoption of new attitudes and practices to increase the level of preparedness among pastoralists to extreme conditions like drought. The extension agencies should fulfill their mandate to carry out public education and provide information to pastoralists and promote resilience and collaboration between different stakeholders in addressing different challenges among them, climate change (Nicholas Ozor, 2011). Failure to which the ASALS will forever be condemned to receiving hand outs for decades to come.      References  Bobadoye A.O, P. O. ( 2016). Pastoralist Perception on Climate Change and Variability in Kajiado in Relation to Meteorology Evidence. Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies Vol 5 No 1 . Dagmawi M. Abegaz, P. W. (2014). Extension Agents' Awareness of Climate Change in Ethiopia. The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension , DOI: 10.1080/1389224X.2014.946936. Emily Susko, M. S. (2013). Role of Extension in climate Adaptation in the United States. Silver Spring, Maryland. FAO. (2016). THE STATE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE; CLIMATE CHANGE,AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY. Rome. ILRI. (2015). Corporate Report 2014-2015. Nairobi, Kenya: International Livestock Research Institute. Kandji, S. T. (2006). Drought in Kenya: climatic, economic and socio-political factors. New Standpoints , 17-19. Ministry of Agriculture, L. a. (2015). Strategic Plan 2013-2017. Nairobi: Government of Kenya.
    675 Posted by Eva Kimonye
  • I am currently taking a unit on flood and drought management and it is interesting to say the least but that is a story for another day. However, this module hits home for me because Kenya is currently going through a very dry season. The water reservoirs and hydro-dams are running below half capacity and those that live in the arid and semi-arid lands are in dire need of food relief. Their livestock which is their sole source of livelihood has not been spared either and the owners have to walk for long distances in search of water and pasture. What shocks me even more is that the country is hoping that the expected long rains in April will solve this crisis. I am always left wondering why we have a meteorological department when occurrences like drought and flood seem to catch us unprepared every single year. Kenya is prone to frequent drought occurrences especially in the arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) that cover 80% of its territory. The ASALs are home to an estimated 11 million people and 70% of the national livestock herd. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries Strategic plan 2013-2017, livestock keeping accounts for approximately 90% of the employment opportunities and nearly 95% of family incomes in the ASALs. In these areas the annual rainfall is in the range of 200 to 500mm and experience frequent droughts and heat waves (Kandji, 2006). Livestock exposure to heat waves increases their vulnerability to diseases directly affecting their reproductive health and meat and milk production which the ASALs communities heavily rely on for food and income (FAO, 2016).The further vulnerability of Kenya to climate change and temperature projections suggesting a rise of 2.5°C between 2000 to 2050 present these communities with the challenge of ensuring food security, access to water and dealing with livestock diseases. The above challenges call for the development of effective adaptation strategies to minimize the effect of climate change and variability on the livelihoods of the people living in ASALs (Bobadoye A.O, 2016). The current approaches and strategies need to be changed in order to build resilience and adaptation capacity among the affected communities (Bobadoye A.O, 2016; Nicholas Ozor, 2011). These communities will be required to embrace new skills and attitudes through knowledge transfer and capacity building a role that can be effectively filled by extension agents (Nicholas Ozor, 2011). Extension agents have influence towards the decisions made by farmers and pastoralists and they therefore play a very important role in the interpretation of climate change and variability research and providing information on adaptation measures necessary to the affected communities (Bobadoye A.O, 2016; Emily Susko, 2013). Adaptation to the impacts of climate change and variability is crucial in protecting the livelihoods and in ensuring food security among the pastoralist communities (Dagmawi M. Abegaz, 2014). There is some acknowledgement by the government on the important role of extension agencies in the agricultural sector. However the livestock subsector only has 20% of the required staff quota making service delivery difficult. All these factors have created a gap in knowledge transfer and capacity development leading to dire consequences. It has not only posed a threat to food security but also presented a new set of challenges in accessing animal feed, water, exposing the livestock to diseases and heat stress and to the general economy with livestock estimated to contribute 5.5% of the country’s GDP (Ministry of Agriculture, 2015). According to the (ILRI, 2015) Corporate Report 2014-2015, Kenya lost USD 3.3 billon in the livestock sector due to drought between 2008 and 2011. As a result pastoralists continue to be pushed deep in poverty due to livestock losses which are their main source of livelihood. In conclusion the changes in climate call for the adoption of new attitudes and practices to increase the level of preparedness among pastoralists to extreme conditions like drought. The extension agencies should fulfill their mandate to carry out public education and provide information to pastoralists and promote resilience and collaboration between different stakeholders in addressing different challenges among them, climate change (Nicholas Ozor, 2011). Failure to which the ASALS will forever be condemned to receiving hand outs for decades to come.      References  Bobadoye A.O, P. O. ( 2016). Pastoralist Perception on Climate Change and Variability in Kajiado in Relation to Meteorology Evidence. Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies Vol 5 No 1 . Dagmawi M. Abegaz, P. W. (2014). Extension Agents' Awareness of Climate Change in Ethiopia. The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension , DOI: 10.1080/1389224X.2014.946936. Emily Susko, M. S. (2013). Role of Extension in climate Adaptation in the United States. Silver Spring, Maryland. FAO. (2016). THE STATE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE; CLIMATE CHANGE,AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY. Rome. ILRI. (2015). Corporate Report 2014-2015. Nairobi, Kenya: International Livestock Research Institute. Kandji, S. T. (2006). Drought in Kenya: climatic, economic and socio-political factors. New Standpoints , 17-19. Ministry of Agriculture, L. a. (2015). Strategic Plan 2013-2017. Nairobi: Government of Kenya.
    Jan 30, 2017 675
  • 23 Jan 2017
    Happy New Year! I hope it is not too late for the New Year wishes and good tidings. I am hoping that we all had a great winter break and we are looking forward to the coming days with great enthusiasm. My holiday from the blog is over so you can expect the weekly updates and links on your whatsApp groups to resume. Today’s entry is really special to me because it is a reflection of what it has meant to be one of the community leaders for the Community of Practice now that the time to handover that responsibility is here. When the call came for the positions it was almost natural for me to apply mostly because I have and continue to be involved in a similar platform albeit with a more broader outreach. We were required to submit an application detailing how we would better the platform and foster more activity online and offline. Looking back I think I underestimated that challenge and the jury is still out on what we achieved and what we slacked on but what cannot be denied is that we have all worked to beat this challenge. This position has provided me with an avenue for personal growth, bettering my communication and leadership skills. My networking abilities have also been honed and I can confidently say that I am a better rounded individual than when it all started. I can bet you that this is also true for other leaders as well. I want to acknowledge the endless support from the PAUWES administration and from the UNU-EHS who envisioned this platform and put all the resources and experts to making sure its operation continues to be top notch. However, the glue that holds this platform together is the group leaders and their members. I have watched their creativity come to play every time something has been required of them and they have always delivered above expectations. I have seen them each shine and grow into their responsibilities be it in event organization, coverage or interaction with their group members, partners and other stakeholders. So to each of them I say thank you and I hope they look back with nostalgia even on those heated moments we may have had. I have always believed that CoP presents a great opportunity for all students to develop their hard and soft skills. That belief continues for me even today because it is a platform run by students for the students. This platform presents an opportunity to network, share ideas and express our creativity. If you are interested in video filming you can sit down with the multimedia team and come up with creative ways to share ideas and as a result better your skills. For those who feel they want to blog, talk to the editorial team and explore ways on which your ideas can be shared with the rest of us and the world. You can stimulate debate on and off the platform by contributing to the work of your respective groups and being part of a greater vision. In short, each of the 7 groups have something for everyone and my challenge to each of you is to challenge how things are done, propose innovative ways to making the platform more active and keep growing as an individual and within groups. In conclusion, I am calling upon all the individuals who feel that they are up for the challenge to make CoP better and themselves as group leaders and community leaders to express their interest. The call for the new student leaders will go out this week and I believe so will that of group leaders and deputy leaders. If you have any questions get in touch with Martin, Mohammed or me and better yet talk to your respective group leaders. The leadership positions are not only fun and out of your comfort zone but they also offer endless networking opportunities. I am excited at what the future holds and you can be sure I will be part of this community for a very long time to come!
    706 Posted by Eva Kimonye
  • Happy New Year! I hope it is not too late for the New Year wishes and good tidings. I am hoping that we all had a great winter break and we are looking forward to the coming days with great enthusiasm. My holiday from the blog is over so you can expect the weekly updates and links on your whatsApp groups to resume. Today’s entry is really special to me because it is a reflection of what it has meant to be one of the community leaders for the Community of Practice now that the time to handover that responsibility is here. When the call came for the positions it was almost natural for me to apply mostly because I have and continue to be involved in a similar platform albeit with a more broader outreach. We were required to submit an application detailing how we would better the platform and foster more activity online and offline. Looking back I think I underestimated that challenge and the jury is still out on what we achieved and what we slacked on but what cannot be denied is that we have all worked to beat this challenge. This position has provided me with an avenue for personal growth, bettering my communication and leadership skills. My networking abilities have also been honed and I can confidently say that I am a better rounded individual than when it all started. I can bet you that this is also true for other leaders as well. I want to acknowledge the endless support from the PAUWES administration and from the UNU-EHS who envisioned this platform and put all the resources and experts to making sure its operation continues to be top notch. However, the glue that holds this platform together is the group leaders and their members. I have watched their creativity come to play every time something has been required of them and they have always delivered above expectations. I have seen them each shine and grow into their responsibilities be it in event organization, coverage or interaction with their group members, partners and other stakeholders. So to each of them I say thank you and I hope they look back with nostalgia even on those heated moments we may have had. I have always believed that CoP presents a great opportunity for all students to develop their hard and soft skills. That belief continues for me even today because it is a platform run by students for the students. This platform presents an opportunity to network, share ideas and express our creativity. If you are interested in video filming you can sit down with the multimedia team and come up with creative ways to share ideas and as a result better your skills. For those who feel they want to blog, talk to the editorial team and explore ways on which your ideas can be shared with the rest of us and the world. You can stimulate debate on and off the platform by contributing to the work of your respective groups and being part of a greater vision. In short, each of the 7 groups have something for everyone and my challenge to each of you is to challenge how things are done, propose innovative ways to making the platform more active and keep growing as an individual and within groups. In conclusion, I am calling upon all the individuals who feel that they are up for the challenge to make CoP better and themselves as group leaders and community leaders to express their interest. The call for the new student leaders will go out this week and I believe so will that of group leaders and deputy leaders. If you have any questions get in touch with Martin, Mohammed or me and better yet talk to your respective group leaders. The leadership positions are not only fun and out of your comfort zone but they also offer endless networking opportunities. I am excited at what the future holds and you can be sure I will be part of this community for a very long time to come!
    Jan 23, 2017 706
  • 27 Dec 2016
    When going into the real estate business, or even constructing your own house in Africa, it would be recommendable to go off-grid. This is because there is an alternative source of energy that is not only friendly to the environment but also pocket-friendly. Solar is becoming cheaper by the day and it is particularly cheaper in Africa as the continent is among the sunniest in the world. This has been driven by the reducing cost of solar PV modules as shown above. Looking at the brief analysis below, you can see how cheap solar is getting. The illustration above shows that the price of solar is below 6 dollar cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) anywhere in Africa as the continent is within the solar belt. Remember too that the pricing is unsubsidized. That cost is even lower than what most people currently pay for electricity in countries all over Africa. To put this into perspective, a report released by African Development Bank indicated that the average cost of electricity in Africa was US $0.14 per kWh against a production cost of US $0.18 per kWh in 2010. The situation hasn’t changed much for my country Kenya as the average cost of electricity for the low consumers is currently about US $0.14 per kWh with most average to high consumers paying about US $0.19 per kWh. That cost is expensive compared to solar and doesn’t take into consideration externalities such as environmental impacts from the use of fossil fuel to generate electricity. Energy Storage.. There is no concern with regards to ensuring a 24-hour supply of electricity as a result of declining cost and continuous improvement of energy storage technologies. Companies such as Tesla hope to produce batteries of $100 per kWh by 2020. There are also other companies undertaking numerous research and development on energy storage aiming to lower the price even further. For this reason, it is practical to establish a real estate business or even construct/convert a home to be purely based on solar energy in Africa. The savings will be enormous from a clean and reliable source of energy. Prospects for savings… Let’s assume you are in Kenya and its 2020 already, the cost of solar averages US $0.045 per kWh while the electricity from the grid remains at US $0.19 per kWh for most middle-class consumers. Let’s also assume a consumption of about 300 kWh every month.  The savings from using solar will be about US $522 in a year. The savings for a about 5 years will be able to purchase a solar energy system, including energy storage, that will provide free electricity for at least 25 years more. I hope we see the sense and embrace solar as a dependable energy source. In fact, there is no need to wait until 2020, make 2017 a year for savings on electricity as well as the environment by adopting solar energy.
    797 Posted by Eric Akumu
  • When going into the real estate business, or even constructing your own house in Africa, it would be recommendable to go off-grid. This is because there is an alternative source of energy that is not only friendly to the environment but also pocket-friendly. Solar is becoming cheaper by the day and it is particularly cheaper in Africa as the continent is among the sunniest in the world. This has been driven by the reducing cost of solar PV modules as shown above. Looking at the brief analysis below, you can see how cheap solar is getting. The illustration above shows that the price of solar is below 6 dollar cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) anywhere in Africa as the continent is within the solar belt. Remember too that the pricing is unsubsidized. That cost is even lower than what most people currently pay for electricity in countries all over Africa. To put this into perspective, a report released by African Development Bank indicated that the average cost of electricity in Africa was US $0.14 per kWh against a production cost of US $0.18 per kWh in 2010. The situation hasn’t changed much for my country Kenya as the average cost of electricity for the low consumers is currently about US $0.14 per kWh with most average to high consumers paying about US $0.19 per kWh. That cost is expensive compared to solar and doesn’t take into consideration externalities such as environmental impacts from the use of fossil fuel to generate electricity. Energy Storage.. There is no concern with regards to ensuring a 24-hour supply of electricity as a result of declining cost and continuous improvement of energy storage technologies. Companies such as Tesla hope to produce batteries of $100 per kWh by 2020. There are also other companies undertaking numerous research and development on energy storage aiming to lower the price even further. For this reason, it is practical to establish a real estate business or even construct/convert a home to be purely based on solar energy in Africa. The savings will be enormous from a clean and reliable source of energy. Prospects for savings… Let’s assume you are in Kenya and its 2020 already, the cost of solar averages US $0.045 per kWh while the electricity from the grid remains at US $0.19 per kWh for most middle-class consumers. Let’s also assume a consumption of about 300 kWh every month.  The savings from using solar will be about US $522 in a year. The savings for a about 5 years will be able to purchase a solar energy system, including energy storage, that will provide free electricity for at least 25 years more. I hope we see the sense and embrace solar as a dependable energy source. In fact, there is no need to wait until 2020, make 2017 a year for savings on electricity as well as the environment by adopting solar energy.
    Dec 27, 2016 797